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About the museum

The Medelhavsmuseet houses Sweden's most important archaeological collections of ancient and historical relics from the Mediterranean countries.

With its well-balanced selection of artefacts and exceptionally fine collections, the museum is one of the few in the world to give visitors a summary in reasonable time of the Mediterranean countries' rich and exciting history, from the earliest traces of humans in Mesopotamia and Egypt to the early Christian and Islamic cultures. The museum is in central Stockholm, in a former bank built in 1905 with a neo-classical interior unique in Scandinavian architectural history and therefore well worth seeing itself. The museum's Oriental café gives visitors a magnificent view of the Royal palace and centre.

THE HISTORY OF THE MUSEUM 

The Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities was founded in 1954 through a merge of the Cyprus collections and the Egyptian Museum. Collections are mostly archeological materials from Swedish excavations in the Mediterranean area, mostly the Swedish Cyprus expedition in 1927-1931. There are also objects collected by Swedish royalty, diplomates and travelers. 

With its central location in Stockholm the museum is a natural hub for conversations, debates and cultural experiences, often with recesses in current events from the Middle East, Northern Africa and Southern Europe. 

The museum's popular café and restaurant Bagdad Café offers a stunning view over Strömmen (the stream), the Royal Palace and the Opera

MUSEUM OF MEDITERRANEAND AND NEAR EASTERN ANTIQUITIES - IN NUMBERS 

YOU CAN ALSO FIND 

Store, café and restaurant with full rights.  

For children: creative workshop, guided tours, audio guides in the exhibitions.  

FIND YOUR WAY HERE 

Located just five minutes form the Central Station, Old Town, and Sergel’s Squareopen in the evening several days a week the museum is with its café and wine bar a cosmopolitan meeting space for conversations, debate and culture. 

Visiting address Fredsagatan 2, Gustav Adolfs Torg